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October 02, 2015 | 30,974 views

Story at-a-glance

  • The Turkish Angora is a lively, playful cat wrapped in a slender, elegant package
  • While white has been the standard coat color for this breed, they are now seen in more than 20 colors, as well as tabby patterns
  • White Turks with one or two blue eyes may be partially or totally deaf
  • Turkish Angoras are know for their outgoing, social personalities that make them seem at times more like dogs than cats
  • If you’re thinking of adding a Turkish Angora to your family, be sure to check your local shelters and rescue organizations first to see if there’s an adoptable cat available

By Dr. Becker

The Turkish Angora is a lively, playful cat wrapped in a slender, elegant package.

While white has been the standard coat color for this breed, they are now seen in more than 20 coat colors, as well as tabby patterns.

White Turks with one or two blue eyes may be partially or totally deaf.

Turkish Angoras are know for their outgoing, social personalities that make them seem at times more like dogs than cats.

If you’re thinking of adding a Turkish Angora to your family, be sure to check your local shelters and rescue organizations first to see if there’s an adoptable cat available.

The Turkish Angora Almost Ceased to Exist

The Turkish Angora is a natural breed named for the city of Ankara (formerly Angora) in Turkey. “Turks” or “Turkeys” as they are sometimes called, may have been the very first longhaired cats to arrive in Europe. The breed at one time was threatened with extinction, but was saved thanks to a breeding program started by the Ankara Zoo. 

White Turkish Angoras arrived in the US in the mid-1950s, but weren’t fully recognized by the Cat Fanciers Association (CFA) until 1972. Cats with colored coats were accepted by the CFA in 1978.

The Turkish Angora Is Exquisitely Beautiful

The Turkish Angora is a graceful creature with a long body, slender legs and chest, a long fluffy tail, large ears, delicate facial features, and huge eyes that can be blue, green, amber, yellow, or odd-eyed (one blue eye and one green eye, for example). Most cats of this breed are small to medium-sized, weighing 5 to 9 pounds.

The Angora has a single coat that is silky and soft to the touch. The fur grows longer in the winter, and shorter during the warmer months of the year. Though white is the predominant coat color for the breed, you can find Turkish Angoras in around 20 colors, and also tabby patterns.

Turkish Angoras Are Smart, Playful Cats

Turks are intelligent kitties with outgoing, playful personalities. They are known to be loving and affectionate, bonding closely with their human family, including kids, seniors, and everyone in between. They like their humans to be attentive and don’t do well left alone for long periods.

Angoras also get along well with other pet housemates, but they do like to be in charge.

Turks Are Talkers

The Turkish Angora is a breed that loves to talk. These kitties are known to be very vocal and will carry on a lively conversation for long periods.

They also like to dance!

The Turkish Angora Loves a Party

This breed is exceptionally outgoing and it’s not unusual to have a Turk acting as host at a human party or other gathering. You’ll find her greeting, inspecting, and interacting with every guest. It’s this extroverted trait that makes Turks seem more like dogs than cats at times.

Turks Are Surprisingly Athletic

Your Angora’s slender, elegant body hides surprising athleticism. These cats are known for their ability to climb and jump onto very high surfaces. They are also adept at opening doors. Turks have an active, determined side to their personalities, and are known to be endlessly entertaining.

Turkish Angoras Are a Generally Healthy Bbreed

Turks are an overall healthy breed, but solid white kitties with one or two blue eyes are prone to deafness in one or both ears.

Other health problems seen in the breed are ataxia (loss of full control of bodily movements), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Fortunately, careful screening by breeders has greatly reduced the incidence of ataxia in Turks, which typically occurs in kittens from 2 to 4 weeks of age.

The Turkish Angora’s Luxurious Coat Requires Surprisingly Little Upkeep

Because the Turk has a single silky coat and no undercoat, she’s easy to groom with just a weekly combing or brushing. The coat doesn’t come in fully until the cat is about 2 years old, and there is minimal shedding.

You should brush your kitty’s teeth several times a week and trim her nails every couple of weeks. Wipe the corners of her eyes with a soft, damp cloth to remove any discharge. Check her ears weekly, and if necessary, wipe them clean with a cotton ball or soft damp cloth.

The Turkish Angora is a thief magnet, so only allow your cat outdoors in a secure area, under your constant supervision.

Turks Like the Water

Many Angoras are known to come running when they hear the sound of water. Yours may splash in the sink, join you in the shower, or cat paddle around in a pond or shallow stream.

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